4.67 from 3 votes
Zaru soba (cold soba noodles) is the best way to eat soba (buckwheat) noodles. Zaru soba is the simplest form of eating noodles and so fast to make. It is a popular summer dish in Japan of course but if you want to be like a connoisseur and enjoy the soba itself, then eat cold even in winter. Use konbu dashi to make it a perfect vegetarian dish.
Zaru Soba (Cold Soba Noodles)
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
10 mins
Total Time
15 mins
 
Zaru soba (cold soba noodles) is the best way to eat soba (buckwheat) noodles. Zaru soba is the simplest form of eating noodles and so fast to make. It is a popular summer dish in Japan of course but if you want to be like a connoisseur and enjoy the soba itself, then eat cold even in winter. Use konbu (kelp) dashi to make it a perfect vegetarian dish.
Recipe Type: Main
Cuisine: Japanese
Serves: 2
Author: Yumiko
Ingredients
  • 2 bunches of dried soba noodles (note 1)
Dipping Sauce
  • 200ml (6.8oz) dashi stock
  • 50ml (1.7oz) soy sauce
  • 50ml (1.7oz) mirin
Condiments
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped shallots (scallions)
  • Wasabi (Japanese horseradish)
Topping (optional)
  • Julienned yaki nori (roasted seaweed sheet)
Instructions
  1. Add dipping sauce ingredients into a saucepan and heat over medium heat.
  2. When small bubbles start coming up around the edge, let it cook for about 15 seconds and turn off the heat. Cool down at least to room temperature (note 2).
  3. Boil water in a large saucepan. Remove the tape from each bunch (if it is bunched) and spread noodles into the pan. Mix for about 15 seconds ensuring that each strand is separated.
  4. Boil for the duration recommended on the back of the pack (4-6 minutes depending on the brand).
  5. Drain into colander and rinse well under running water. Shake the colander well to remove water at the bottom of the colander and leave until required.
  6. Plate soba noodles on a large plate to share or two plates for individual serves.
  7. Sprinkle yaki nori on the top.
  8. Serve with dipping sauce in a small bowl with condiments.
Recipe Notes

1. Each bunch is usually 90g (3.2oz) of dried noodles. When cooked, it expands in volume. Depending on how hungry you are, some people might find that a bunch of soba per person is a bit too much. If left over, you can add the soba in clear soup or make salad!

2. You could serve the dipping sauce warm if you like. Some people in Japan eat zaru soba with warm dipping sauce. But I personally like it cool otherwise it seems to defeat the whole purpose of having cold noodles.

3. If you don't use yaki nori, then call it mori soba.